• Preservation Groups Appeal Federal Court Ruling on Construction of Dominion Transmission Line

    June 20, 2018

    Last week, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Preservation Virginia filed a notice of appeal asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to review the recent federal court ruling that allows Dominion Energy to proceed with constructing a massive transmission line across the James River at Jamestown.

    In July 2017, the Army Corps of Engineers granted the necessary federal permit to allow Dominion Energy to proceed with construction of the project without preparing a full Environmental Impact Statement as required under the National Environmental Policy Act or fully considering reasonable and prudent alternatives as required by the National Historic Preservation Act. The National Trust and Preservation Virginia subsequently filed a lawsuit to ensure that legal, proper and reasonable steps were taken to analyze the project’s impacts and viable alternatives.

    Despite the failure to prepare a full Environmental Impact Statement and fully consider alternatives, a federal judge ruled last month that the Army Corps complied with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act in granting the permit. The notice of appeal seeks reconsideration of that decision. We will keep sharing new information as the appeal progresses.

  • Federal Court Ruling Will Allow James River Power Project to Continue

    May 24, 2018

    Today, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled that Dominion Power may proceed with building a transmission line supported by 17 towers across the James River at Jamestown.

    Sharee Williamson, associate general counsel at the National Trust for Historic Preservation said, “We are disappointed by the court’s decision to allow Dominion to build a massive transmission line across the James River at Jamestown. The National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act are intended to provide safeguards against siting industrial projects in historically significant landscapes. This outcome is a real disappointment, and we are currently considering our next steps. This nationally-significant historic place deserves to be preserved for future generations.”

    The James River flows through a collection of nationally recognized cultural, historic, and natural resources located in Virginia’s Historic Triangle - a region which receives over 3.5 million visitors annually. The National Trust has been engaged with efforts to protect the James River – and the evocative landscapes of the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail, Historic Jamestowne, Colonial Parkway, and Carter’s Grove – for years. The James was named to the 2013 and 2016 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list and was named a National Treasure in 2014.
  • National Trust Files Final District Court Brief

    March 7, 2018

    The National Trust and our partners at Preservation Virginia recently filed our final brief in support of our request to revoke the permit issued to Dominion Virginia Power by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to build a massive transmission line across the James River at Jamestown.

    Response briefs from the Department of Justice and Dominion are due on March 26, 2018. After those briefs are filed, a decision from the court can come at any time.

    We will keep sharing new information as the lawsuit progresses.

  • Legal Briefs Filed to Protect the James River

    December 18, 2017

    On Friday, the National Trust and our partners at Preservation Virginia filed a motion for summary judgment in our lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The motion asked the court to vacate the permit that the agency granted to Dominion Virginia Power to construct a massive transmission line across the James River at Jamestown and to order the Army Corps to prepare a Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to thoroughly review less harmful alternatives.

    The Mattaponi Indian Tribe in Virginia filed an amicus brief in support of the National Trust’s lawsuit. The tribe is one of the six original Native American tribes of the Powhatan Confederacy. Represented by the University of Virginia School of Law’s Environmental and Regulatory Clinic, the brief focuses on the cultural importance of the region to the tribe.

    A briefing schedule for the case has been established with final filing deadlines in March 2018. We will keep sharing new information as the lawsuit progresses.

1 - 5 of 16 updates

Speak up for Route 66! Join the National Trust in supporting a National Historic Trail designation for Route 66.

Sign the Petition