June 15, 2018

Preservation Personals: A Maryland Estate Built for Eating, Drinking, and Being Merry

  • By: Mikayla Raymond

I’m a radiant Colonial Revival home, built in 1961 for the prominent Watkins family in Prince George’s County, Maryland. Bowie (pronounced like “buoy”) owes its existence to the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Company, which built a railway from Baltimore to Southern Maryland in 1869, and is home to Maryland’s oldest historically black college, Bowie State University.

I am a two-story, five-bay, white-painted brick beauty, with a slate roof and large porticos to the front and rear supported by Tuscan columns. The two-story structure is flanked on either side by recessed one-story L-shaped wings that extend towards the rear. I was built on a romantic, wooded knoll of 3.72 acres, which has been meticulously landscaped.

My grand, fan-lighted front door leads to my soft coral hued entryway. On the first floor are several classically decorated rooms, from the living and family rooms, to my wood-paneled office, and to the fully-outfitted gourmet kitchen. I have four fireplaces spread throughout my nearly 5,000 square feet. I have four bedrooms and three-and-a-half bathrooms including an in-law suite, but I also have some more imaginative rooms geared towards entertaining— like my 15-seat film projection theater, exercise room, and full-sized wet bar with accompanying dance floor in my finished basement.

My back flagstone porch opens up onto a large, grassy lawn. I was originally an estate and working tobacco farm of 50 acres, but became part of a suburban subdivision in the 1990s known as Grovehurst. However, my view to more recently-constructed homes is blocked by large, mature trees.

Learn more about me here.

My scenic exterior.

photo by: Gary Geston

Bowie, MD 20721.

My bright, double-arched entryway.

photo by: Gary Geston

My entryway, looking back towards my grand front door.

My green-walled library.

photo by: Gary Geston

This living space is built and decorated in a more modern style, and comes outfitted with a wet bar!

Mikayla Raymond is a proud preservationist and editorial intern at the National Trust. She lives for public parks, weird art, and women’s history.

mraymond@savingplaces.org

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