November 18, 2014

Roundup: The Starter Kit for Renovating Historic Homes

141118_blog-photo_toolkit_house

Buying a historic house with the intention of fixing it up is a significant undertaking -- and one that can come with its share of surprises. Understanding how to ask the right questions before you begin renovating is key to the overall success of your project.

This round-up of toolkits from the 10 on Tuesday vault (now Preservation Tips & Tools) will help give you an idea of what to consider and how to find sensible solutions as you look to restore or rehabilitate your newly acquired treasure.

---

10 Tips for Finding Clues to Your Home’s History

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Tips for Finding Clues to Your Home’s History from PreservationNation

Before you begin to fix up your historic home, you’ll need to do a little research. Put on your detective cap and look closely at the house inside and out. Make note of changing styles, from floor plans to architecture to paint color. Get 10 ideas of what to look for.

---

Restore vs. Rehabilitate: Which is Right for Your Historic House?

[10 on Tuesday] Restore vs. Rehabilitate: Which is Right for Your Historic House? from PreservationNation

Restoring a house means returning it to its original form using materials as similar as possible to the original ones. Rehabilitating means repairing the house and making it usable while preserving the historically and culturally significant portions. Find out which approach is right for you.

---

Should You DIY or Hire a Professional?

[10 on Tuesday] Should You DIY or Hire a Professional? from PreservationNation

For DIYers, there are often many projects to keep you busy when you buy a historic house. For those who may not have the time, many professionals are available to help. No matter which camp you fall in, this toolkit offers a list of various people you can call.

---

How to Plan Your Restoration or Rehabilitation Project

[10 on Tuesday] How to Plan Your Restoration or Rehabilitation Project from PreservationNation

Regardless of who’s doing the work, there are several important steps to consider when planning the restoration or rehabilitation of your historic home, from analyzing existing conditions to planning what parts of construction happen when. See all 10 steps.

---

How to Keep a Renovation/Rehabilitation Project From Breaking the Bank

[10 on Tuesday] How to Keep a Renovation/Rehabilitation Project from Breaking the Bank from PreservationNation

Last but certainly not least, you’ll want to make sure you can afford all the projects you’re planning that will turn your historic house into a home. Before you begin sawing wood or hiring contractors, browse this list of 10 ways to make your dollars go farther.

Este Lugar Me Importa: Your donation will send much needed supplies to help the recovery efforts in Puerto Rico.

Help Now