• Good news for the James River!

    March 1, 2019

    Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals in the D.C. Circuit ruled that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to follow the federal legal requirements when they decided to allow Dominion Energy to build a massive power line and 17 towers across the James River at Jamestown.

    The court rejected Dominion Energy’s permit and directed the Army Corps of Engineers to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The towers were energized earlier this week.

    Read our full statement.

    We want to take a moment to thank you for your dedication, whether you signed our petition in support, sent letters to your local officials, or submitted comments to urge the EIS. You helped ensure a decisive victory for this National Treasure and a win for historic preservation.

    But we’re not done yet. The towers still need to come down, and your donation can help us get the James River across the finish line.

    photo by: Kris Weinhold

  • Case Awaiting Decision by the Court of Appeals

    December 19, 2018

    Briefing by the National Trust and the Department of Justice in the litigation to protect the James River at Jamestown was completed before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals this fall. On December 7, 2018, oral arguments were heard before a three judge panel. This appeal challenges the lower court’s decision that the Army Corps of Engineers complied with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act in issuing a permit to Dominion Virginia Power to construct a massive transmission line across the James River in the viewshed of Carter’s Grove National Historic Landscape, Colonial Parkway, and Jamestown Island. We expect to receive a decision sometime in the new year.

  • Opening Briefs Filed in the James River Appeal

    August 22, 2018

    On August 10th, the National Trust and our partners at Preservation Virginia filed our opening brief before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Our appeal challenges the lower court’s decision that the Army Corps of Engineers complied with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act in issuing a permit to Dominion Virginia Power to construct a high voltage transmission line across the James River at Jamestown. The Cultural Landscape Foundation and the Lawyers’ Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation, represented by the Southern Environmental Law Center, also filed an amicus brief in support of our arguments. All briefs will be filed in the case by the end of October and oral arguments are expected to be scheduled for later this year.

  • Preservation Groups Appeal Federal Court Ruling on Construction of Dominion Transmission Line

    June 20, 2018

    Last week, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Preservation Virginia filed a notice of appeal asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to review the recent federal court ruling that allows Dominion Energy to proceed with constructing a massive transmission line across the James River at Jamestown.

    In July 2017, the Army Corps of Engineers granted the necessary federal permit to allow Dominion Energy to proceed with construction of the project without preparing a full Environmental Impact Statement as required under the National Environmental Policy Act or fully considering reasonable and prudent alternatives as required by the National Historic Preservation Act. The National Trust and Preservation Virginia subsequently filed a lawsuit to ensure that legal, proper and reasonable steps were taken to analyze the project’s impacts and viable alternatives.

    Despite the failure to prepare a full Environmental Impact Statement and fully consider alternatives, a federal judge ruled last month that the Army Corps complied with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act in granting the permit. The notice of appeal seeks reconsideration of that decision. We will keep sharing new information as the appeal progresses.

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