You’re Invited: Special Exhibit Celebrating Historic Little Havana

February 20, 2018 by Jason Clement

Little Havana, Miami, Florida

photo by: Cyn Lagos

Always moving to its own rhythm, Little Havana is the beating heart of Miami and a cherished symbol of the American melting pot.

From its role as a haven for Cuban Americans to its more recent incarnation as a home for immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean, Little Havana’s streets have been shaped by generations of people seeking community and making new lives for themselves. And along the way, they’ve created a place so beautiful and so complex that Little Havana has become one of the most iconic neighborhoods in the country.

That’s why we’re excited to invite you to a special exhibit celebrating this remarkable place. Presented by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Heineken USA, and the Little Havana Me Importa Coalition, “Little Havana Me Importa: The Faces and Places That Define a Neighborhood” steps into the daily lives of ten local residents whose passion, creativity, and penchant for history is ensuring that future generations will experience the Little Havana we know today. Their stories are different and their backgrounds are diverse, but they all share a common love: the place they call home.

When: The exhibit’s debut event will be held Friday, February 23, at 6:30 PM during Viernes Culturales, the monthly cultural festival on historic Calle Ocho (SW 8th Street).

Where: Calle Ocho in the alleyway adjacent to the Futurama Building at 1637 SW 8th Street.

Cost: This exhibit is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required, but space is limited so please RSVP today. Can’t make it? Don’t worry – the exhibit will be on display in the same location on Calle Ocho through May.


RSVP Today: SavingPlaces.org/LittleHavanaExhibit

Join the movement to save and sustain historic African American places. The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund will help every American see themselves, their history, and their potential in our collective story and national cultural landscape.

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