Statement | June 29, 2022

National Trust Statement Regarding the Army Corps of Engineers Section 106 Review for Greenfield Terminal, St. John the Baptist Parish, Wallace, LA

The National Trust for Historic Preservation shares the concerns and objections to the proposed Greenfield Terminal project that have been expressed by a wide variety of historic, cultural, and environmental partners, including the President’s Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation. The proposed Greenfield Terminal site, formerly Whitney Plantation land, is immediately adjacent to the Whitney Plantation and Evergreen Plantation, two historic sites that are nationally significant leaders in interpreting the history of slavery. The proposed site likely contains important archaeological resources including the remains of a former burial plot for enslaved people. Given the expansive size and scope of the proposed industrial development, we urge the Army Corps of Engineers to deny the permit for the Greenfield Terminal, not only because of the substantial adverse impacts it would have on these irreplaceable, nationally significant historic resources, but also because the developer is violating the integrity of the permit process by initiating pre-construction activities before the Army Corps has even begun its review under the National Historic Preservation Act.

While proponents of the development are emphasizing its potential economic benefits, the National Trust and others believe that this large industrial development would significantly diminish the cultural heritage tourism industry in the area, currently one of the greatest contributors to the economy of the region and one of its most emblematic characteristics.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.
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The National Trust's African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund has awarded $3 million in grants to 33 places preserving Black history.

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