Press Release | Washington, DC | March 16, 2015

National Trust for Historic Preservation Names Historic African House at Melrose Plantation a National Treasure

Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation named African House, located at Melrose Plantation in Natchitoches, Louisiana, a National Treasure. Unique in its structure and unknown purpose, the building is also home to world-renowned folk artist Clementine Hunter’s murals.

Melrose Plantation was established in 1796 by former slave Louis Metoyer, a free person of color. In the 1820’s, Metoyer commissioned his enslaved workers to construct the house however, no records exist that give an exact date of its construction, original purpose or explain its unusual design which reflects the style of traditional architecture of houses in Africa.

Today, the two-story hut-like building stands threatened by deterioration and destabilization. Preservation of the brick masonry walls and roof structure are needed to ensure the site is protected and reopened for public tours as an important part of the story of Melrose Plantation.

“African House is a unique testament to the confluence of cultures that helped to shape Louisiana, and America as a whole,” said Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “The architecture at African House speaks boldly of the presence of African culture along the Cane River– and symbolizes how African and French influences combined in this region.”

In naming the African House a National Treasure, the National Trust is committed to supporting the site’s restoration. The National Trust’s HOPE Crew (“Hands-on Preservation Experience” Crew) will address repair needs on the roof and other exteriors. HOPE Crew is an initiative of the National Trust that trains thousands of crew members in useful historic preservation skills.

“African House speaks for generations of hard working individuals through its massive hand hewn cypress beams and handmade bricks,” said Vicki Parrish, president of the Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches which owns and operates Melrose Plantation.
“As preservationists, our mission is to listen to the voices of the past, and it is through the restoration of their handiwork that we discover just what they are telling us. It is our hope that every person who visits African House will discover for themselves a distinct voice from our culturally rich Cane River past.”

Further enhancing the historical significance of African House are nine murals by folk artist Clementine Hunter. Painted in oil on plywood and installed on the building’s interior walls, the murals depict early 20th century landscapes and scenes of daily life at the plantation.

As a farm-hand at Melrose Plantation, Hunter began painting in the 1930s when she was in her 50s. She created more than 4,000 paintings over four decades, drawing national acclaim and exhibits in galleries across the country. Today, Hunter’s works are sought after by collectors. The African House murals have been conserved and will be returned to African House when the building’s restoration is completed.

“Clementine Hunter left an indelible mark on Melrose Plantation with her inspired murals,” said Meeks. “These amazing works of folk art were created for the African House, and they should be exhibited there. We are working to see that happen.”

For Media: RSVP to visit the HOPE Crew project at the African House on Wednesday, March 18. For more details, contact Jessica Pumphrey at jpumphrey@savingplaces.org.

To learn more about plans to restore the African House, visit http://www.savingplaces.org/african-house-at-melrose-plantation

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About the National Treasures Program

National Treasures are a portfolio of highly-significant historic places throughout the country where the National Trust makes a long-term commitment to find a preservation solution. As the presenting partner of the National Treasures program, American Express has pledged $2 million to help promote and enable the preservation of these cultural and historic places. For more information, visit www.savingplaces.org.

About Melrose Plantation

Melrose Plantation is a National Historic Landmark. Considered one of the finest examples of a Creole plantation in America, the story of Melrose Plantation reflects the multi-faceted cultural identity of the Cane River area’s unique culture of Creoles, African-Americans and Caucasian Americans. The site is owned and operated by the Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches and is open to the public for tours. For more information, visit www.melroseplantation.org.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.
SavingPlaces.org | @savingplaces

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