Guide

HOPE Crew Highlights Across the U.S.

HOPE Crew, named for Hands-On Preservation Experience, is a National Trust initiative designed to train more young people in preservation crafts while helping to protect historic public sites on cultural lands. Since 2014, HOPE Crew has completed 99 projects around the country, empowered over 600 diverse young people and veterans in preservation trades, and helped support over $14.3 million dollars of preservation work. This program is part of an inclusive, multifaceted preservation movement that represents the full range of the American experience.

In celebration of its 100th project at Fort Monroe National Monument in Hampton, Virginia, we're looking back on some of HOPE Crew's successes. From the African House at Melrose Plantation in Louisiana to the historic Hinchliffe Stadium in Northern New Jersey, each HOPE Crew project helps protect historic sites, teaches young preservationists invaluable skills, and fosters passion for saving places in our communities.

  1. Photo By: Audrey Hall

    Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

    Their first project to take place at a National Cemetery, HOPE Crew corpsmembers reset and repaired headstones dating as far back as the 1876 Battle of Little Bighorn.

  2. Photo By: NPS/Beinlich Photography

    Painted Desert Community Complex

    A modernist marvel and National Treasure, Painted Desert Community Complex was an exceptional example of Mission 66—a nationwide campaign that resulted in a radically new Modern style of Park architecture. HOPE Crew corpsmembers restored the community complex's original paint colors to its exterior.

  3. Photo By: Minesh Bacrania

    Bandelier National Monument

    Bandelier National Monument is one of the nation's largest collections of pre-Hispanic archaeological sites. A group of Tribal youth helped stabilize ruins at this significant cultural landscape via HOPE Crew and the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps of New Mexico.

  4. Photo By: Kbose – stock.adobe.com

    San Antonio Missions National Historical Park

    HOPE Crew corpsmembers worked on several structures at this UNESCO World Heritage site, which remains an active parish today.

  5. Photo By: Library of Congress

    African House at Melrose Plantation

    African House, a National Treasure, is an enigmatic, uniquely African structure originally constructed during the 19th century at Melorse Plantation in Louisiana. HOPE Crew corpsmembers have completed several rehabilitation projects on the building, resulting in the return of folk artist Clementine Hunter's famous murals to their original home.

  6. Photo By: Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa

    Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial

    Now used primarily as an events center, President Abraham Lincoln's childhood home was one of HOPE Crew's 2015 projects. Along with The Conversation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa, corpsmembers worked to restore the building's 32 wooden pews.

  7. Photo By: William H. Ransom

    Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park

    This historic site includes both Martin Luther King, Jr.'s childhood home and other structures important during his young life. Corpsmembers repainted and repaired the exterior of two homes found on the site.

  8. Photo By: Kevin Summers

    Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore

    Five HOPE Crew corpsmembers led preservation efforts at the National Lakeshore's historic Goffar Barn, dating back to the 1870s.

  9. Photo By: Susana Raab

    Shenandoah National Park

    HOPE Crew's first-ever project rehabilitated the exterior of the Skyland Stables, constructed in 1939 within Shenandoah National Park's Skyland Resort.

  10. Photo By: Melissa Murphy

    Hinchliffe Stadium

    One of the few remaining stadiums in the country with ties to Negro League baseball, this National Treasure was repaired by more than 700 volunteers led by HOPE Crew.

  11. Photo By: Environmental Stewards

    Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site

    One HOPE Crew corpsmember led an eight-week project to repair the roof of one of the buildings that make up the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site.

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